Wednesday, March 26, 2008

It Goes on Everything

Last Sunday morning a considerable contingent of GameSpot editors and producers past and present, their significant others, and even my own parents converged on San Francisco's best British pub, the Pig & Whistle. Led by our resident loveable limey Justin Calvert, we took part in the sort of terrible breakfast gluttony that I thought was unknown outside my own native southeast. Ladies and gents, I give you the Full English:


That's baked beans, bangers (sausage to us yanks), bacon, a frightening mess of scrambled eggs, English muffin, fried potatoes (how did I forget the fried potatoes?) and one lonely slice of fresh tomato. Understand this picture represents no more than two-thirds of the original quantity of food; I was so excited to start eating that I actually forgot to take a picture beforehand. Here's the aftermath, in which I take a great deal of pride:


The best part about enjoying this breakfast is that the Pig & Whistle stocks copious amounts of HP Sauce, arguably the finest condiment known to man. (I also forgot to get Mr. Calvert on camera extolling its virtues, which he does very well.) Imagine a sauce with the consistency of ketchup but a flavor much closer to a traditional steak sauce, like A1. But there are some other subtle flavors going on in there too, something sweet and tangy that I can't put my finger on. It's delectable. The best part, as the title implies, is you can put it on ANYTHING. You may notice the gentle looping, the delicate distribution of brown sauce across the entire plate. It went on the eggs, the meats -- heck, even the beans, and those come in their own sauce already. Next time I get a chance, I'm putting HP on my ice cream. (It's great in a bloody mary, natch.)

There are actually multiple types of HP, based on where they're manufactured. Calvert will tell you the UK version is the best, because it's made with a specific kind of sugar instead of high fructose corn syrup or some madness like that. Whatever, let's not split hairs. Get it however you can. I encourage you to educate yourself on this best of all sauces. You don't hear a lot of kind words said about British food, but they sure as hell got this one right.

15 comments:

jeff said...

Man, now I'm totally bummed that I had to show up two hours late. Stupid Easter.

I won't miss out next time. That looks awesome. And like it could kill someone.

Dazz Hardy said...

This is where I'd usually say I could eat that for breakfast in some kind of macho way. But I'm English, and that is actually a typical breakfast for me when I have breakfast, so I feel the humour would be lost.

Also, good to see one of the few 'proper' english meals being enjoyed outside of England, especially alongside the King of Sauces.

mattyftm said...

Thats not a full english breakfast. Its a partial english breakfast. Its missing Hash browns, black pudding, mushrooms and fried bread. And realy the eggs should be fried not scrambled, but at least there were eggs, so I'll let you off with that one.

In the pics I notice newcastle brown ale beermats. Newcastle brown ale is the greatest beer in the world ever. I didn't realise you could get it over the pond.

Jared said...

Man, I so have never heard of sausage being called "bangers." Guess its because if you were to call it that in SC you would probably get shot.

Paul said...

That looks way to damn good.

Milkman519 said...

That looks really delicious...

James said...

HP actually put out some HP baked beans for a while. I havnt seen them around in years though

Darian said...

Man that looks good...

Thierry said...

Mmm, beans, sausage and beacons, the meal looks unhealthy but tasty.

yo said...

Nothing beats a good hearty breakfast.

Danny O'Dwyer said...

Over here we call it a full irish, though its sometimes acompanied by some ultra healthy morning whiskey or guinness. Though im with Matty, you gotta have fried eggs, hash browns, mushies and bread till its a FULL english breakfast.

HP on icecream? Thats a tangy disaster.

Jason said...

Impressive, but it still doesn't beat the Boj - ham & egg biscuit, bacon egg & cheese, bo-berry biscuit, and extra large order of bo-rounds. I do, however, admit that it's close, both in enormity and artery-clogging capabilities.

shadwell said...

Yup, fried bread is a necessity, the egg needs to be fried (how else are you going to dip sausages and fried bread in egg yolk?) but most importantly where's your cup of tea man?! Tea is vitally important. The relationship between tea and cooked fat is key to the Full English experience. The tea should also be in a china cup, not a coffee mug because it always tastes better like that.

Steve said...

Yep... That'll keep you going no doubt.

Nothing better then a Full English on a miserable morning to bring the spirits up, but it must be occampanied with a slice of awfully greasy fried bread to make it complete in my opinion.

Wobag said...

Sadly, there is now strictly no such thing as the UK version of HP Sauce. Heinz recently closed down the local factory that produced it, and move production to Holland.

The tower of the building, with a giant electric HP sign was a landmark, and a local radio station recently campaigned to save it.

Oh and the bangers thing, a lot of americans make out that thats what sausages are called here. Its simply a nickname, sausages are sausages!